Seeing the Isle of Man from Cleveleys

Seeing the Isle of Man from Cleveleys

The Isle of Man, in the Irish Sea, is 100km from land at the Fylde Coast – but yet it can still sometimes be seen from Cleveleys

The tallest hill on the Isle of Man is Snaefell, at the very top it’s 621 metres above sea level.

When standing on the coast you should only be able to see the top of Snaefell. Yet sometimes at sunset on a clear night, and more rarely during the day, you can see much more of it than you should be able to, allowing for the curve of the earth as it disappears over the horizon.

When standing on the shore at Cleveleys, you can often see the Isle of Man – when the conditions are right.

You can also see the growth of the offshore wind farm in these photos. These are all taken by Visit Cleveleys – except where credited to another photographer.

View of the windfarm and Isle of Man, July 2017
View of the windfarm and Isle of Man, July 2017

View of the windfarm and Isle of Man, July 2017
View of the windfarm and Isle of Man, July 2017

View of the Isle of Man in 2016, taken by David Pennington
View of the Isle of Man in 2016, taken by David Pennington

View of the Isle of Man from Cleveleys, taken in 2015
Taken in 2015

View of the Isle of Man in March 2013
March 2013

View of the Isle of Man August 2012
View of the Isle of Man August 2012

View of Isle of Man from Cleveleys taken in August 2012
Taken in August 2012

View of Isle of Man taken from Cleveleys in 2012Taken April 2012

The Isle of Man seen in daylight from Cleveleys, August 2011
Daylight view of the Isle of Man, August 2011

View of the Isle of Man, July 2011
View of the Isle of Man, July 2011

The Isle of Man Mirage

If you are lucky enough to be in the right place at the right time, you are seeing the Isle of Man with the help of an atmospheric phenomenon.

This is a summary of information from www.overwyre.info
Click through to the link for the full scientific and mathematic explanation!

Refractive looming, refractive towering and maybe helped by a Superior Mirage, helps you to get a clear view of the hills and valleys, as the light is affected by the atmospheric conditions.

A superior mirage is a reasonably rare event, seen when the air near to the ground is colder than the air above it – or in this case the sea and the air just above it maintains a cold temperature as the less dense air above it can warm up more quickly.

In this instance the layers of differing refractive index cause the rays of light to be bent, and sometimes reflected, downwards.

Under these conditions you can actually see over the horizon, which is why you can see more of the Isle of Man than you strictly should be able to from Cleveleys.

Refractive Towering
Refractive Towering

Refractive Looming
Refractive Looming


Find out More

Read the original article from which this was taken, and even examine the maths behind it, in this link.

View of Isle of Man from CleveleysView of Isle of Man from Cleveleys.
Taken July 2012

View of Isle of Man from CleveleysPhoto taken August 2012

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